FULL STORY: Council tax in the Cotswolds to fall by three per cent following last-minute amendment to budget

FULL STORY: Council tax in the Cotswolds to fall by three per cent following last-minute amendment to budget

FULL STORY: Council tax in the Cotswolds to fall by three per cent following last-minute amendment to budget

First published in Cotswolds news
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COUNCIL tax in the Cotswolds is to be cut, for the second time in the same number of years, by three per cent.

The plans were revealed as part of a last minute amendment by council leader Cllr Lynden Stowe at Cotswold District Council’s meeting on Thursday, February 27.

He said that the reduction, which will see adults in a Band D property pay CDC £133.05 a year, £4.11 less than 2013, was probably the joint biggest cut to council tax in the country.

“It’s a pleasure to pass on some of the substantial savings we have made to the taxpayer for a second year in a row, especially when most cost of living charges are on the rise,” he said.

“Leaving more money in people’s pockets can only be good for our local economy.”

Meanwhile, Gloucestershire County Council has agreed to freeze its cut of the council tax to £1,090.50 while the amount being paid to the county’s Police and Crime Commissioner has increased by 1.99 per cent to £207.73.

This means that the average council tax bill for a Band D property in 2014/15 will be £1,490.63.

As well as the tax cut, Cllr Stowe also announced a host of spending plans for the coming year, including a £200,000 investment in the district’s flood defenses and the introduction of a new parking tariff at Cirencester’s Brewery car park.

Motorists using the car park on Sundays will now be able to pay 50p for a 30 minute and £1.30 for an hour as well as the option to pay £1.50 for an all day ticket.

Cllr Stowe said that CDC understood that many drivers only wanted to use the car park for a short period of time on a Sunday and that the “new charges would be even fairer”.

The Liberal Democrat group on CDC also submitted a budget amendment that would completely eradicate Sunday charges in the car park.

Cirencester mayor Joe Harris said: “There is no rationale for the charges to be in force. Residents hate them, businesses hate them, let’s get rid of them once and for all.”

Despite the group’s best efforts, the amendment was thrown out with 23 members of the council voting against it.

It was also heard that, because of CDC’s cost-cutting measures, there will be a freeze on car parking charges, leisure fees and green waste collection until 2016 at the earliest.

Last year the council made headlines when it cut its council tax portion by more than five per cent, a reduction larger than anywhere else in the country.

Comments (6)

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4:24pm Thu 27 Feb 14

Olly Cromwell says...

When the opportunity was presented to abolish the 24/7 car parking charges in Cirencester, it shall be remembered the (almost exclusively) out of town Conservative Councillors voted against it.

The Council Tax reduction was supported by all Councillors but we must note it benefits those in the largest houses most - it is regressive in nature.

The toffs are still looking after the toffs.
When the opportunity was presented to abolish the 24/7 car parking charges in Cirencester, it shall be remembered the (almost exclusively) out of town Conservative Councillors voted against it. The Council Tax reduction was supported by all Councillors but we must note it benefits those in the largest houses most - it is regressive in nature. The toffs are still looking after the toffs. Olly Cromwell
  • Score: 4

9:36am Fri 28 Feb 14

Susie Clark says...

And who does a council tax increase benefit, Olly ? Try bringing up a family in Cirencester, with year on year spiralling precept increases from Lib Dem Cirencester Town Council - a freeze by the county and another reduction by CDC is a welcome relief. I don't think a Cotswold family living on the average salary in the area which is, I think, around £20K p.a. would class themselves as toffs when it comes to benefitting from council tax reduction.
It's good to have a council who can manage their budget and give tax reductions without bleating about government cuts.
And who does a council tax increase benefit, Olly ? Try bringing up a family in Cirencester, with year on year spiralling precept increases from Lib Dem Cirencester Town Council - a freeze by the county and another reduction by CDC is a welcome relief. I don't think a Cotswold family living on the average salary in the area which is, I think, around £20K p.a. would class themselves as toffs when it comes to benefitting from council tax reduction. It's good to have a council who can manage their budget and give tax reductions without bleating about government cuts. Susie Clark
  • Score: -3

11:23am Fri 28 Feb 14

Rex Cooper says...

A council could go on freezing increases forever and what would that achieve ? - The further deterioration of services that this district council has presided over ,to the detriment, mainly of the average family.
A comparison between town,district and county council budgets shows that it is the latter two that matter - the town council is peanuts.
In any case the district councils abject failure to produce a local plan ( to save money ? ) is going to cost our community much,much more than any money they may have saved - like the councils reputation and the heritage of the Cotswolds - when the developers move in.
A council could go on freezing increases forever and what would that achieve ? - The further deterioration of services that this district council has presided over ,to the detriment, mainly of the average family. A comparison between town,district and county council budgets shows that it is the latter two that matter - the town council is peanuts. In any case the district councils abject failure to produce a local plan ( to save money ? ) is going to cost our community much,much more than any money they may have saved - like the councils reputation and the heritage of the Cotswolds - when the developers move in. Rex Cooper
  • Score: 2

11:33am Fri 28 Feb 14

MrMarkHarris says...

The big print giveth - council tax deduction
The small print taketh away - no concession on car parking charges

The policy is clearly to raise money through indirect taxation so that people like Susie think they are a jolly decent and well managed council.

The Town Council increase represents an increase of 12p a month.

In the past few years the Town Council has taken over the management of, amongst other things;
- the Amphitheatre from English Heritage,
- CCTV from the District Council,
- the Christmas lights switch on and festivities from the Chamber of Commerce - the Farmers' Market.

12p is hardly spiralling!
The big print giveth - council tax deduction The small print taketh away - no concession on car parking charges The policy is clearly to raise money through indirect taxation so that people like Susie think they are a jolly decent and well managed council. The Town Council increase represents an increase of 12p a month. In the past few years the Town Council has taken over the management of, amongst other things; - the Amphitheatre from English Heritage, - CCTV from the District Council, - the Christmas lights switch on and festivities from the Chamber of Commerce - the Farmers' Market. 12p is hardly spiralling! MrMarkHarris
  • Score: 3

2:38pm Fri 28 Feb 14

MrMarkHarris says...

By the way - that 3% amounts to £4.11 a year! You can park in the Abbey Grounds in Cirencester for 5 hours for £3.90 and have 21p change :-) But only once.
By the way - that 3% amounts to £4.11 a year! You can park in the Abbey Grounds in Cirencester for 5 hours for £3.90 and have 21p change :-) But only once. MrMarkHarris
  • Score: 4

9:51pm Wed 5 Mar 14

David Broad says...

CDC actually reduced one of the car parking charges and froze the others in addition to reducing the Council Tax.
CDC actually reduced one of the car parking charges and froze the others in addition to reducing the Council Tax. David Broad
  • Score: -2

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