Thames Water must do more to prevent flooding, according to Cotswold MP Geoffrey Clifton-Brown

Thames Water must do more to prevent flooding, according to Cotswold MP Geoffrey Clifton-Brown

Thames Water must do more to prevent flooding, according to Cotswold MP Geoffrey Clifton-Brown

First published in Cotswolds news by

OFFICIALS at Thames Water must invest more money into improving the sewerage system across the Cotswolds, according to local MP Geoffrey Clifton-Brown.

The Cotswolds MP has met with the water company to pass on the concerns of his constituents and to say that the water firm must upgrade its network to help prevent future sewer flooding across the district.

He has also called for a debate on the issue in Parliament which is expected to take place in the next couple of weeks.

Mr Clifton-Brown said that he has received a number of complaints from people across the Cotswolds relating to the activities of Thames Water.

“I can assure all my constituents that I have been taking all of these concerns up directly with Thames Water and will continue to do so,” he said.

“For example, I put a number of cases directly into the hands of a senior director at Thames Water who has assured me I will receive urgent responses from them.

“I am now calling for this debate so we can address the lack of investment Thames Water has made in the area.”

The MP, who has served the Cotswolds for over 20 years, raised the subject during business questions in the House of Commons last week.

During the debate, he said: “May I add my voice to those of others and ask the Leader of the House for an urgent debate on flooding, particularly so that I can highlight Thames Water’s lack of investment in its sewerage systems in Cirencester, Fairford, South Cerney and other places?”

Mr Clifton-Brown told the House that the Cotswolds has had “serious” sewer flooding and it has been “exacerbated” by a surge of large planning applications for residential dwellings in flood plains.

Following the debate, the MP met with Richard Aylard, a Thames Water director, to discuss specific individual cases and general flooding concerns across the district.

Mr Aylard told Mr Clifton-Brown that Thames Water look into the incidents raised and will provide him with a timeline for further work in the Cotswolds.

For more information, visit www.cliftonbrown.co.uk.

Comments (2)

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9:06am Mon 3 Mar 14

Olly Cromwell says...

The water utilities should never have been privatised.

What our part-time MP is slowly discovering is that he is impotent in the face of crude venture water capitalists owned by an Australian Bank and structured so no UK Corporation Tax is payable.

A water bill boycott is what is required.
The water utilities should never have been privatised. What our part-time MP is slowly discovering is that he is impotent in the face of crude venture water capitalists owned by an Australian Bank and structured so no UK Corporation Tax is payable. A water bill boycott is what is required. Olly Cromwell
  • Score: 2

10:47am Mon 3 Mar 14

Bill Courtney says...

Modern large field farming has reduced the water holding capacity of our agricultural land and the accelerated soil erosion is silting up our rivers and land drains.
Thames Water should champion a return to the smaller, more sheltered farm fields of the early Victorian era, but using teams of robot tractors instead of labour intensive horse drawn ploughs. Creating this technology should not be too challenging; the French are already using robots instead of humans in their Vineyards.
Robot-tractors will give us the environmental benefits of Victorian farming while keeping food production costs down.
As a bonus, the build-up of water holding humus in the soil will trap carbon dioxide and reduce the climate change that is probably aggravating our flooding problems.
Thames Water would benefit directly because water would have more time to trickle down into the aquifers instead of being flushed into the rivers.
This proposal for flood reduction farming is discussed on the Cheshire Innovation web site, www.cheshire-innovat
ion.com.
Modern large field farming has reduced the water holding capacity of our agricultural land and the accelerated soil erosion is silting up our rivers and land drains. Thames Water should champion a return to the smaller, more sheltered farm fields of the early Victorian era, but using teams of robot tractors instead of labour intensive horse drawn ploughs. Creating this technology should not be too challenging; the French are already using robots instead of humans in their Vineyards. Robot-tractors will give us the environmental benefits of Victorian farming while keeping food production costs down. As a bonus, the build-up of water holding humus in the soil will trap carbon dioxide and reduce the climate change that is probably aggravating our flooding problems. Thames Water would benefit directly because water would have more time to trickle down into the aquifers instead of being flushed into the rivers. This proposal for flood reduction farming is discussed on the Cheshire Innovation web site, www.cheshire-innovat ion.com. Bill Courtney
  • Score: 0

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