Is there a big cat on the loose in Cirencester?

Is there a big cat on the loose in Cirencester?

Is there a big cat on the loose in Cirencester?

First published in News
Last updated
Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard: Brendan McFadden
Wilts and Glos Standard by , Reporter

A BIG cat has been spotted on the loose in Cirencester.

The Standard was informed that a black big cat was seen  in a field next to Cirencester Rugby Football Club on Sunday August 17 at 4pm.

Police spokesman Nigel Sargeant said the police have received no big cat reports.

Chairman of Cirencester Rugby Football Club, Tim Thompson said nobody from the club had sighted any of the animals.

“I have not seen anything and not heard a thing. We had a committee meeting recently and nobody said anything.”

Have you seen the big cat? If so email bmc@wiltsglosstandard.co.uk

Comments (14)

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12:52pm Wed 27 Aug 14

manta51 says...

Slow news day methinks...
Slow news day methinks... manta51
  • Score: 7

1:15pm Wed 27 Aug 14

Supreme Chancellor Finis Valorum says...

"Police spokesman Nigel Sargeant said the police have received no big cat"

That settles it then.

Was this it?

http://www.funnycats
ite.com/pictures/Big
_Black_Cat.jpg
"Police spokesman Nigel Sargeant said the police have received no big cat" That settles it then. Was this it? http://www.funnycats ite.com/pictures/Big _Black_Cat.jpg Supreme Chancellor Finis Valorum
  • Score: 9

1:55pm Wed 27 Aug 14

Jessica Rabbit says...

Yawn....
Yawn.... Jessica Rabbit
  • Score: 5

9:19pm Wed 27 Aug 14

Geoff66 says...

Having seen some of the deposits being left on my lawn , then that is a possible YES ;-)
Having seen some of the deposits being left on my lawn , then that is a possible YES ;-) Geoff66
  • Score: 3

3:03am Thu 28 Aug 14

jedthered says...

I am pretty certain that there is a cat in that area, i walk up the Burford road 2 or 3 times a week, and i saw a large black shadow cross the road and go into the allotments about 4 months ago, i was walking towards hare bushes and had just passed the BP garage on a Sunday night about 22:45, the road , for once was very quiet, I dont know where it came from, but the first time i saw it , it was in the middle of the road. The way it walked made me instantly think it was a cat,it stood about 36 inches tall and maybe about 6 foot long, it was totally black in colour, i suppose i was about 150 yards away when this happened.
You all might think that i imagined this , but as far as im concerned it was a large cat, in fact i crossed the road and walked on the other side of the road just to be on the safe side, in case i disturbed it .
I am pretty certain that there is a cat in that area, i walk up the Burford road 2 or 3 times a week, and i saw a large black shadow cross the road and go into the allotments about 4 months ago, i was walking towards hare bushes and had just passed the BP garage on a Sunday night about 22:45, the road , for once was very quiet, I dont know where it came from, but the first time i saw it , it was in the middle of the road. The way it walked made me instantly think it was a cat,it stood about 36 inches tall and maybe about 6 foot long, it was totally black in colour, i suppose i was about 150 yards away when this happened. You all might think that i imagined this , but as far as im concerned it was a large cat, in fact i crossed the road and walked on the other side of the road just to be on the safe side, in case i disturbed it . jedthered
  • Score: 4

11:38am Thu 28 Aug 14

paulpaterson says...

Just as children want to believe in Santa Claus or Father Christmas long after they've realised he doesn't exist, so people want to believe in 'Big Cats' in the U.K., long after common sense tells them they don't exist. People love to believe in fantasy - it gives them a frisson of excitement in an otherwise humdrum existence! Sorry, but NO "big cats" roaming about wild and free in the mainland UK.
Just as children want to believe in Santa Claus or Father Christmas long after they've realised he doesn't exist, so people want to believe in 'Big Cats' in the U.K., long after common sense tells them they don't exist. People love to believe in fantasy - it gives them a frisson of excitement in an otherwise humdrum existence! Sorry, but NO "big cats" roaming about wild and free in the mainland UK. paulpaterson
  • Score: -9

9:39am Fri 29 Aug 14

Jessica Rabbit says...

WHAT???? Father Christmas isn't real????? How dare you say such a thing.... Jeez... I can't believe the lies on here.
WHAT???? Father Christmas isn't real????? How dare you say such a thing.... Jeez... I can't believe the lies on here. Jessica Rabbit
  • Score: 2

12:49am Tue 2 Sep 14

jedthered says...

paulpaterson wrote:
Just as children want to believe in Santa Claus or Father Christmas long after they've realised he doesn't exist, so people want to believe in 'Big Cats' in the U.K., long after common sense tells them they don't exist. People love to believe in fantasy - it gives them a frisson of excitement in an otherwise humdrum existence! Sorry, but NO "big cats" roaming about wild and free in the mainland UK.
Fantasy, Humdrum, maybe for you but i am nearing my 60th birthday, ive travelled the world and seen a lot of big cats . and have a full and active life, There is always the "1" that wants to ridicule what others have said. Strange that you use the words "common sense" i can use the same words to say "its common sense that there could be big cats on the prowl in the UK"
Works both ways!
[quote][p][bold]paulpaterson[/bold] wrote: Just as children want to believe in Santa Claus or Father Christmas long after they've realised he doesn't exist, so people want to believe in 'Big Cats' in the U.K., long after common sense tells them they don't exist. People love to believe in fantasy - it gives them a frisson of excitement in an otherwise humdrum existence! Sorry, but NO "big cats" roaming about wild and free in the mainland UK.[/p][/quote]Fantasy, Humdrum, maybe for you but i am nearing my 60th birthday, ive travelled the world and seen a lot of big cats . and have a full and active life, There is always the "1" that wants to ridicule what others have said. Strange that you use the words "common sense" i can use the same words to say "its common sense that there could be big cats on the prowl in the UK" Works both ways! jedthered
  • Score: 2

12:31pm Tue 2 Sep 14

paulpaterson says...

“Invariably some “expert” will state that the big cat was a “Panther”, Panther-Like, Puma-Like. The moment that word “Panther” is used then I would call such expertise into question. No one within a zoological, zoo or working with big cats, including myself, will ever call such a feline a “Panther”, let alone a “Black Panther”. This is not to dispute that the word does not exist because it does. Lions are Panthera Leo; Tigers are Panthera tigris and the Leopards are of course Panthera pardus. Of the three the only one to be called a “Panther” is the Leopard and then only it is was a melanistic or black leopard. If it were it would be called a “Black Panther” and not simply a Panther, but zoologically speaking there is no such animal called a “Black Panther”. Within zoos and the zoological world, such people including myself would term Black Leopards rather than make up some pseudo name. There are indeed black jaguars too Panthera Onca and once again these animals would be called Black Jaguars and NOT black panthers or panthers. No expert let alone zoo staff will use the term “Panther”. Those so called “experts” who go on about big cats within the UK will go on record stating it was Panther-like, Puma-like etc. The Puma and the Cougar are not Panthera cats and as far as I am aware zoologically speaking there has been only two ever recorded cases of black Puma, one being in Brazil in 1843 and one being in Costa Rica in 1959.

These “experts” who tend to be associated with groups who are dedicated to proving the existence of wild Big Cats in the UK, although they will say that this or that was here or there, or that someone saw this or that, a body was found or that there are sheep and deer kills, the evidence is now where to be found or seen. These groups will always say that they do have such picture, video, body evidence but when the time comes to show this then the evidence fails to stack up and holds to credulity to it. One cannot help admire their dedication, their hobby, it is not a bad hobby but these people are indeed very misinformed, mind you there are some who are seen as total eccentric to a few who are very keen.” (Peter Dickinson, 40 years as a zoo keeper and curator ret.) http://peterdickinso
n.hubpages.com/hub/B
ig-Cat-Sightings
“Invariably some “expert” will state that the big cat was a “Panther”, Panther-Like, Puma-Like. The moment that word “Panther” is used then I would call such expertise into question. No one within a zoological, zoo or working with big cats, including myself, will ever call such a feline a “Panther”, let alone a “Black Panther”. This is not to dispute that the word does not exist because it does. Lions are Panthera Leo; Tigers are Panthera tigris and the Leopards are of course Panthera pardus. Of the three the only one to be called a “Panther” is the Leopard and then only it is was a melanistic or black leopard. If it were it would be called a “Black Panther” and not simply a Panther, but zoologically speaking there is no such animal called a “Black Panther”. Within zoos and the zoological world, such people including myself would term Black Leopards rather than make up some pseudo name. There are indeed black jaguars too Panthera Onca and once again these animals would be called Black Jaguars and NOT black panthers or panthers. No expert let alone zoo staff will use the term “Panther”. Those so called “experts” who go on about big cats within the UK will go on record stating it was Panther-like, Puma-like etc. The Puma and the Cougar are not Panthera cats and as far as I am aware zoologically speaking there has been only two ever recorded cases of black Puma, one being in Brazil in 1843 and one being in Costa Rica in 1959. These “experts” who tend to be associated with groups who are dedicated to proving the existence of wild Big Cats in the UK, although they will say that this or that was here or there, or that someone saw this or that, a body was found or that there are sheep and deer kills, the evidence is now where to be found or seen. These groups will always say that they do have such picture, video, body evidence but when the time comes to show this then the evidence fails to stack up and holds to credulity to it. One cannot help admire their dedication, their hobby, it is not a bad hobby but these people are indeed very misinformed, mind you there are some who are seen as total eccentric to a few who are very keen.” (Peter Dickinson, 40 years as a zoo keeper and curator ret.) http://peterdickinso n.hubpages.com/hub/B ig-Cat-Sightings paulpaterson
  • Score: 1

12:32pm Tue 2 Sep 14

paulpaterson says...

But there's the key word – imaginary. Is this big cat real or is it an illusion? The blurred photograph (why so shaky, was it fear or fake fear?), the believers move with a cult-like shout and say; "they are here, we have seen them and there is proof" Personally I'm sceptical even about the large scale release that supposed to have followed the introduction of the Dangerous Wild Animal Act, it smacks of urban myth, let alone there having been any breeding, or subsequent releases. The fools always quoted by the press or by themselves within their own blogs and website banter are rather too often referred to by the press as a ‘Big Cat expert’ when nothing could be further from the truth. They appear to have no direct experience of working with big cat species. ...then we have the UK Government and it's own quango saying; "A spokeswoman said: "None of the sightings of big cats have ever been confirmed and the evidence of all the sightings we have been asked to look at has either been unsubstantiated or has been attributed to other causes. From time to time big cats do escape from zoos or other collections and are usually recaptured very quickly. We are confident that there is no breeding population of big cats in this country." (Natural England)
But there's the key word – imaginary. Is this big cat real or is it an illusion? The blurred photograph (why so shaky, was it fear or fake fear?), the believers move with a cult-like shout and say; "they are here, we have seen them and there is proof" Personally I'm sceptical even about the large scale release that supposed to have followed the introduction of the Dangerous Wild Animal Act, it smacks of urban myth, let alone there having been any breeding, or subsequent releases. The fools always quoted by the press or by themselves within their own blogs and website banter are rather too often referred to by the press as a ‘Big Cat expert’ when nothing could be further from the truth. They appear to have no direct experience of working with big cat species. ...then we have the UK Government and it's own quango saying; "A spokeswoman said: "None of the sightings of big cats have ever been confirmed and the evidence of all the sightings we have been asked to look at has either been unsubstantiated or has been attributed to other causes. From time to time big cats do escape from zoos or other collections and are usually recaptured very quickly. We are confident that there is no breeding population of big cats in this country." (Natural England) paulpaterson
  • Score: -1

12:33pm Tue 2 Sep 14

paulpaterson says...

Silly Season Already…?
It must be, the 'Mail' is in full spate, asking those questions that invariably attract a 'No, don't be so ridiculous' answer. And the local papers are getting in on the act too:
There have been so many big cat sightings in Leicestershire and Rutland – the latest on January 1 – that some experts are convinced there are breeding populations.
‘Experts’? Do you mean vets, biologist, zoo personnel?
For big cat hunter Nigel Spencer, the interest in the big cats that seem to be living and breeding in parts of Leicestershire has become a passion.

Nigel has taken over the reins of Rutland and Leicestershire Pantherwatch, an organisation set up by his father, David.
Ah. Right. No, clearly you mean Internet obsessives.

It seems to be the modern definition of 'expert', which believe me, I'm challenging wherever it appears: The 49-year-old, from Oakham, said: "Big cats are breeding in the UK, without a shadow of a doubt. "
You’ll have some proof, then?
"But actually filming them in the wild and proving there are breeding populations out there – rather than just the occasional escaped animal – is very difficult."

He said the stealthy movements of the animals, combined with the areas they live in, make them hard to find.

"In Africa, you just set up a camera by a water hole and all the animals from two miles around will come by, and in the Americas, where pumas come from, they can be seen in the open country.

"Here, they can easily dart into the undergrowth and quickly disappear. "
Newsflash, Nigel; most of the cougar’s range in North America is not that much different from England, with the possible exception of our moors. Surprisingly enough, it even contains 'undergrowth'!

And seeing a cougar in anything like open country (save when they encroach on human areas) is about as ‘easy’ as seeing a leopard in daylight in Africa.

Some ‘expert’…
Nigel said the main questions of doubters could be answered easily.
Oh, really?
"It's been too long for these new sightings to be animals released in the 70s, so that suggests they're breeding in the wild or being bred for the black market and being released."
/facepalm
A spokeswoman for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said it did not collect reports on big cats and had never found conclusive evidence of big cats living in the wild.
For once, I think I have a lot more faith in the official government line than in any other explanation….http:
//thylacosmilus.blog
spot.co.uk/.../silly
-season...
Silly Season Already…? It must be, the 'Mail' is in full spate, asking those questions that invariably attract a 'No, don't be so ridiculous' answer. And the local papers are getting in on the act too: There have been so many big cat sightings in Leicestershire and Rutland – the latest on January 1 – that some experts are convinced there are breeding populations. ‘Experts’? Do you mean vets, biologist, zoo personnel? For big cat hunter Nigel Spencer, the interest in the big cats that seem to be living and breeding in parts of Leicestershire has become a passion. Nigel has taken over the reins of Rutland and Leicestershire Pantherwatch, an organisation set up by his father, David. Ah. Right. No, clearly you mean Internet obsessives. It seems to be the modern definition of 'expert', which believe me, I'm challenging wherever it appears: The 49-year-old, from Oakham, said: "Big cats are breeding in the UK, without a shadow of a doubt. " You’ll have some proof, then? "But actually filming them in the wild and proving there are breeding populations out there – rather than just the occasional escaped animal – is very difficult." He said the stealthy movements of the animals, combined with the areas they live in, make them hard to find. "In Africa, you just set up a camera by a water hole and all the animals from two miles around will come by, and in the Americas, where pumas come from, they can be seen in the open country. "Here, they can easily dart into the undergrowth and quickly disappear. " Newsflash, Nigel; most of the cougar’s range in North America is not that much different from England, with the possible exception of our moors. Surprisingly enough, it even contains 'undergrowth'! And seeing a cougar in anything like open country (save when they encroach on human areas) is about as ‘easy’ as seeing a leopard in daylight in Africa. Some ‘expert’… Nigel said the main questions of doubters could be answered easily. Oh, really? "It's been too long for these new sightings to be animals released in the 70s, so that suggests they're breeding in the wild or being bred for the black market and being released." /facepalm A spokeswoman for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said it did not collect reports on big cats and had never found conclusive evidence of big cats living in the wild. For once, I think I have a lot more faith in the official government line than in any other explanation….http: //thylacosmilus.blog spot.co.uk/.../silly -season... paulpaterson
  • Score: -1

2:57pm Tue 2 Sep 14

User1986 says...

Great Story!
Great Story! User1986
  • Score: 0

9:51pm Sat 6 Sep 14

Boes75 says...

Grrrrr..... I saw this thing and people think I'm mad too, but it was walking no more than 4metres from the side of my car at 2 in the morning, just glad I wasn't walking. Not a sight that I will ever forget and probably not one that I will ever see again. When and if you people ever see something out of the ordinary, firstly you will try to convince yourself that it wasn't real because its not the "norm" closely followed by trying to convince complete sceptics that it was real.
I truly hope that one day whilst out enjoying the Cotswold countryside walking, camping, driving or the like you also have the opportunity to see this beautifully graceful animal whatever you choose to call it, I just live in hope that it is hungry and shuts you right up.
Grrrrr..... I saw this thing and people think I'm mad too, but it was walking no more than 4metres from the side of my car at 2 in the morning, just glad I wasn't walking. Not a sight that I will ever forget and probably not one that I will ever see again. When and if you people ever see something out of the ordinary, firstly you will try to convince yourself that it wasn't real because its not the "norm" closely followed by trying to convince complete sceptics that it was real. I truly hope that one day whilst out enjoying the Cotswold countryside walking, camping, driving or the like you also have the opportunity to see this beautifully graceful animal whatever you choose to call it, I just live in hope that it is hungry and shuts you right up. Boes75
  • Score: -1

12:31pm Thu 11 Sep 14

paulpaterson says...

But there's the key word – imaginary. Is this big cat real or is it an illusion? The blurred photograph (why so shaky, was it fear or fake fear?) reveals what genre this picture belongs to. It's summer and the monster animal snaps are here. Remarkably, the warm summer has not yet produced any sightings of great white sharks off Cornwall or kraken near Anglesey, but here's an animal mystery to spice up those country walks. Beware the possible puma!

The idea of leopards still living in Europe is very powerful. Every year a new and ferocious creature turns up in England, one that exists only in newspaper columns, vividly imprecise eyewitness reports, blurry photographs of black ***** cats and our eternal appetite for monsters: the Beast of Bodmin, the Surrey Puma, the Fen Tiger." Simon Barnes of the Times. No "big cats" in the wilds and breeding in the UK.

"A spokeswoman said: "None of the sightings of big cats have ever been confirmed and the evidence of all the sightings we have been asked to look at has either been unsubstantiated or has been attributed to other causes."From time to time big cats do escape from zoos or other collections and are usually recaptured very quickly. We are confident that there is no breeding population of big cats in this country." natural england

I would go a step further if a breeding population of these animals existed hard evidence would be abundant and commonplace Its absence shows that there is no such populationWith the possible exception of the very occasional fugitive, the beasts reported by so many sober upright, reputable people are imaginarySaidGeorge Monibot The Never-Spotted Leopard,May 22, 2013 No "big cats" in the UK and No evidence whatsoever to show or prove it let alone show that they are breeding.
But there's the key word – imaginary. Is this big cat real or is it an illusion? The blurred photograph (why so shaky, was it fear or fake fear?) reveals what genre this picture belongs to. It's summer and the monster animal snaps are here. Remarkably, the warm summer has not yet produced any sightings of great white sharks off Cornwall or kraken near Anglesey, but here's an animal mystery to spice up those country walks. Beware the possible puma! The idea of leopards still living in Europe is very powerful. Every year a new and ferocious creature turns up in England, one that exists only in newspaper columns, vividly imprecise eyewitness reports, blurry photographs of black ***** cats and our eternal appetite for monsters: the Beast of Bodmin, the Surrey Puma, the Fen Tiger." Simon Barnes of the Times. No "big cats" in the wilds and breeding in the UK. "A spokeswoman said: "None of the sightings of big cats have ever been confirmed and the evidence of all the sightings we have been asked to look at has either been unsubstantiated or has been attributed to other causes."From time to time big cats do escape from zoos or other collections and are usually recaptured very quickly. We are confident that there is no breeding population of big cats in this country." natural england I would go a step further if a breeding population of these animals existed hard evidence would be abundant and commonplace Its absence shows that there is no such populationWith the possible exception of the very occasional fugitive, the beasts reported by so many sober upright, reputable people are imaginarySaidGeorge Monibot The Never-Spotted Leopard,May 22, 2013 No "big cats" in the UK and No evidence whatsoever to show or prove it let alone show that they are breeding. paulpaterson
  • Score: 1
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