Tetbury resident targeted in phone scam

Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard: Tetbury resident targeted in phone scam Tetbury resident targeted in phone scam

A TETBURY resident has been targeted in a scam which allows fraudsters to gain access to computers.

As part of the scam, the caller, who claims to represent Microsoft Windows, rings from a fake number, asks people enter a code on their computer so they can gain remote access to their machine.

The resident was suspicious of the caller and dialled 1471 to trace the call and found that it originated in the US, before reporting the incident to police.

The bogus caller claims an application or programme on the computer is causing problems for Windows and they can fix it.

A female representative of a silver surfers group in Evesham, was also targeted in the scam.

They received three similar calls, one in Broadway and two in Evesham, and had received a call herself at their home

The resident, who did not want to be named, said: "It's an absolute rip off this thing. Once they've got the control of your keyboard they can wipe everything out. They can do a lot of damage.

"Once you put this code in, it gives them the right to take over your display. Then they can clear all your files, go through your bank details, everything. People must be aware they mustn't do it. "

They added people must be aware of calls from the number 0203 129 1891 as this is a fake number and does not work.

"I phoned BT and they say it's a scam and it's a false number," she added. "It's come from overseas. It's quite worrying."

If anyone has been targeted by the scam or has information then call police on 101.

Comments (3)

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8:16pm Mon 28 Apr 14

JGH says...

The person was not targeted at all as this was a random call.
The only way people get duped by this type of scam is by not using common sense.
You wouldn't leave your door open with your family silver on display so why would you give access to your computer just because somebody phones you without you contacting them first?
The person was not targeted at all as this was a random call. The only way people get duped by this type of scam is by not using common sense. You wouldn't leave your door open with your family silver on display so why would you give access to your computer just because somebody phones you without you contacting them first? JGH
  • Score: 7

11:33pm Mon 28 Apr 14

David Broad says...

I am quite concerned if they have started using American operatives, I have always had Indians or Bangladeshis ring me, "Good Afternoon Mr Brode," which winds me up straight away, "I am from Microsoft and you have a problem with your computer." I then reply, "Which one?" which completely floors them as they cannot grasp the concept of one person having more than one Computer, "Your computer," they reply. On a slow day I can keep them hanging on for ten minutes or more with them getting more and more irate, "No I don't have that symbol," I explain patiently as I do something else entirely , "Yes I've done that," I say, "Its Ubuntu Linux does that make a difference," and they are so terminally thick they still don't twig I am winding them up. Still if it had been someone with a genuine Southern Belle type American accent the first time I think I may have been taken in too.
I think the odds of Microsoft ringing are about the same as a ten million quid win at Bingo.
I am quite concerned if they have started using American operatives, I have always had Indians or Bangladeshis ring me, "Good Afternoon Mr Brode," which winds me up straight away, "I am from Microsoft and you have a problem with your computer." I then reply, "Which one?" which completely floors them as they cannot grasp the concept of one person having more than one Computer, "Your computer," they reply. On a slow day I can keep them hanging on for ten minutes or more with them getting more and more irate, "No I don't have that symbol," I explain patiently as I do something else entirely , "Yes I've done that," I say, "Its Ubuntu Linux does that make a difference," and they are so terminally thick they still don't twig I am winding them up. Still if it had been someone with a genuine Southern Belle type American accent the first time I think I may have been taken in too. I think the odds of Microsoft ringing are about the same as a ten million quid win at Bingo. David Broad
  • Score: 5

12:32pm Tue 29 Apr 14

Harry_Collier says...

I used to get such calls often, with an obviously Indian voice. I became so fed up that, the last time it happened, I strung him along for a bit then, when it came to "tell me what you see on your screen" I replied: "It say beware of Pakistani scammers with fake virus alerts". First time I've heard anyone splutter. He then gasped "Your father was a Pakistani" and hung up and my number seems to have been deleted from their calling system.
I used to get such calls often, with an obviously Indian voice. I became so fed up that, the last time it happened, I strung him along for a bit then, when it came to "tell me what you see on your screen" I replied: "It say beware of Pakistani scammers with fake virus alerts". First time I've heard anyone splutter. He then gasped "Your father was a Pakistani" and hung up and my number seems to have been deleted from their calling system. Harry_Collier
  • Score: 0

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