Plans for proposed renewable energy plant go on display in Chelworth

Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard: An artist’s impression of the proposed solar development at Chelworth An artist’s impression of the proposed solar development at Chelworth

PLANS for a proposed renewable energy plant at Chelworth will go on public display next week.

The proposals for a solar farm have been put forward by the Wiltshire Wildlife Trust (WWT) and Bath and West Community Energy (BWCE) for land next to Braydon Lane, near the Chelworth Industrial Estate.

The bank of two-metre high solar panels would have the potential to generate one megawatt of electricity, which could power 225 homes by converting sunlight directly into electricity.

It is estimated this would save the equivalent of 11,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide during the plant’s 20-year life.

WWT director Gary Mantle said: "The local generation of electricity from solar panels will help Wiltshire reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and play its part in mitigating climate change."

The 2.5-hectare site, which is owned by WWT, is accessed from the industrial estate and does not form part of the Blakehill Farm Nature Reserve.

Chairman of BWCE Pete Carpenter added: "We are pleased to be involved in this exciting project that will be offering the local community and WWT members the opportunity to own and invest in the generation of clean electricity."

The public consultation and exhibition of the plans will take place between 1pm and 8pm on Thursday, November 15, at Cricklade House in Cricklade.

Comments (5)

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9:26am Thu 8 Nov 12

David Broad says...

CDC approved one near Chipping Campden a while ago, and I commented then that the panels would make handy shelters for pigs, half joking, but there is no logical reason that the ground under the panels could not be grazed by sheep, for instance and kept in agricultural use rather than being mown as the picture suggests,
The installation does look rather crude though and I would have thought arranging some form of motorised automatic pivoting so the panels could tilt to to at least optimise their angle re the horizon to maximise solar gain woule have been part of the scheme.. This has got to be much better than the random sprinkling of hideous and ineficient carbuncular retrofitted solar panels which now blight many properties in some of our prettiest villages. Storage of the electricity generated during the day so it can be used for lighting and heating at night still remains the big problem in powering 225 hpmes, I think the article should have said "Equivalent to 225 homes," Which is something else entiras ely. Solar Panels don't work at night.
CDC approved one near Chipping Campden a while ago, and I commented then that the panels would make handy shelters for pigs, half joking, but there is no logical reason that the ground under the panels could not be grazed by sheep, for instance and kept in agricultural use rather than being mown as the picture suggests, The installation does look rather crude though and I would have thought arranging some form of motorised automatic pivoting so the panels could tilt to to at least optimise their angle re the horizon to maximise solar gain woule have been part of the scheme.. This has got to be much better than the random sprinkling of hideous and ineficient carbuncular retrofitted solar panels which now blight many properties in some of our prettiest villages. Storage of the electricity generated during the day so it can be used for lighting and heating at night still remains the big problem in powering 225 hpmes, I think the article should have said "Equivalent to 225 homes," Which is something else entiras ely. Solar Panels don't work at night. David Broad
  • Score: 0

6:51pm Fri 9 Nov 12

Olly Cromwell says...

Isn't that you David in the pic with the sheep?
Isn't that you David in the pic with the sheep? Olly Cromwell
  • Score: 0

12:37am Sat 10 Nov 12

David Broad says...

Don't think so Olly, wrong colour hat, my wide brim hat is white.
Don't think so Olly, wrong colour hat, my wide brim hat is white. David Broad
  • Score: 0

10:21am Sat 10 Nov 12

bobirving says...

I presume that the energy used and extra complexity of automatically realigning the panels makes that uneconomic. I don't think that they are particularly sensitive to alignment.
I presume that the energy used and extra complexity of automatically realigning the panels makes that uneconomic. I don't think that they are particularly sensitive to alignment. bobirving
  • Score: 0

9:31pm Sat 10 Nov 12

David Broad says...

See
http://www.solar-fac
ts.com/panels/panel-
mounting.php
Obviously most panels are roof mounted and their angle can't be adjusted but there is extra efficiency to be had by adusting the angle if free standing.
See http://www.solar-fac ts.com/panels/panel- mounting.php Obviously most panels are roof mounted and their angle can't be adjusted but there is extra efficiency to be had by adusting the angle if free standing. David Broad
  • Score: 0

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